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one of the most amazing things in this whole episode, martha, is that there is a 2011 opinion, 86 pages long from the fisa court that ruled, that much of what the nsa is doing which is spying on american citizens is both unconstitutional in violation of the fourth amendment and illegal, a violation of the statute. this opinion remains a complete secret. the fisa court has said they have no objection to having it released, but the obama administration insists it has to be secret. both members of congress and
thing, one of the most amazing things in this whole episode, martha, is that there is a 2011 opinion,
a name for themselves. >> thank you very much for joining us. >> good. >> thank you, martha.
stephanopoulos" starts now. >>> good morning. i'm martha raddatz. george has the morning off. it's great to have you with us. and we begin with breaking news as more than 20 embassies and consulates are closing around the world right now. and here at home, increased security measures are now in place. abc news has learned this morning that the intercepted communications that led to the alert indicate terrorists are planning an attack that is going to be big and, quote, strategically significant. yesterday the white house held an hour's long meeting, high-level meeting with the country's top national security officials to discuss the response to the threat, and we've just learned what went on at that meeting, so let's go straight to jon karl, who is at the white house, and, jon, it sounds like the national security community is really spooked by this. >> reporter: no doubt about that, martha. the high-level meetings here at the white house over the weekend are a sign of just how seriously the u.s. is taking this threat. in fact, officials tell us they believe that there are al qaeda operatives al
. >> from abc news, a special edition of "this week" with martha raddatz in cairo. and jonathan karl in washington. starts right now. >>> good morning, george is off today. we're reporting from a region on the brink, and all eyes are on syria, where an apparent chemical weapons attack could lead to american military action. here in cairo, we're just 100 miles from the mediterranean sea where u.s. warships are now at the ready. this morning, officials tell abc news that u.s. navy destroyers now in the mediterranean could be used to carry out limited military strikes. cruise missile strikes, designed to deter or prevent another chemical attack by the assad regime. if this week's suspected attack is verified. >> this is clearly a big event. of grave concern. that starts getting to some core national interest that the united states has. >> president obama has so far been unwilling to militarily intervene in syria, despite the deaths of more than 100,000 people and a vow he made more than one year ago. >> that's a red line for us. and that there would be enormous consequences if we start
and political will. we'll have more from washington in a few moments. but first back to the region, martha. >> thanks, jon. let's bring in colonel steve, a veteran fighter pilot who flew missions in the gulf war and was a deputy secretary of state. welcome, colonel. let's get to the question about the cruise missile strikes. the white house said there will be no boots on the ground. how would these work out of the mediterranean? >> there are a couple ways it could be done. one is by launching them from ships at sea out in the eastern mediterranean or from submari submarines. it's a long, 20-foot sort of flying torpedo, and has wings and a little jet engine that allows it to fly at low altit e altitudes over the sea. it can fly through mountain canyons and hit with accuracies where you can pick third window on the left. that is good. but we have to remember they're small warheads, and not a lot of these missiles. right up front, if it's low-risk, we're going to be prescribed in the amount of military force we can apply. >> one of the things we have talked to people about, is there might be
at all. >> i'm joined by martha raddatz. this crisis has been unfolding for months, and it's a case-study in u.s. impotence. when the brotherhood is in, the u.s. tries to press the brotherhood to open up. they don't. the president condemns the crackdown. that makes no difference either. >> we seem to have no leverage in egypt. we have seen no change. everything the u.s. asks for, nothing happens. that's what's happened over the last few weeks. military to military, they're trying to influence them, back off, don't go into the camps. they go in and they do it. the president has not taken away, made any indication he will take away the $1.3 billion in military aid, and i don't think you'll see the president try to take that away. they're trying to get a plan together before congress comes back. what do we do, but right now there is no plan or leverage except for military equipment. >> but you see more cause of senators mccain and graham, saying it's time to suspend aid. and if the military continues, the crackdown, won't the u.s. be forced into that position? >> that's the question. w
embassies and consulates closed after a global terror alert are open again. martha raddatz has been tracking the threats that led to the closing. are the embassies opening again now because u.s. officials believe the drone strikes in yemen this week actually got the plotters? >> george, officials say the plotters of this specific plan were not killed in strikes in yemen, but the dead are part of the network of terrorists trying to kill americans. intelligence officials believe the plan was to send a truck bomb into the u.s. embassy there. but a senior u.s. official, that because of the actions taken, the terrorists have likely moved the explosives out of the vehicle and are changing tactics. adding that we think that the imminent threat dissipated, but fear they have gone back to ground waiting for the next opportunity to strike. this immediate threat may have passed, but the threat of terrorism never passed. >> we heard from u.s. officials that tlebl that the nsa surveillance programs helped track this emerging threat. the president announced some reforms on friday in those programs. and ha
thing to do. >> thank you very much. the panel, martha raddatz, bill kristol, a long time since you have been here. let me begin with the congressman. i take it you saw both the senator and the congressman laid out the dilemma. not quite willing to cut off u.s. aid. you are? >> yes, i would cut off aid, but engage in intense diplomacy in egypt and the region to restore aid when you stop the bloodshed in the street and set up a path towards democracy that you were on before. in my mind, there's no way to say it's not a coup. it is. we should say so. and then follow our own law which says we cannot fund the coup leaders. the african union said this, europeans said this, we can say this too. not just the short-term, but we should look at long-term integrity in the region. >> one country that's not said it is israel. they want to keep the aid flowing. >> they prefer the military rule to the muslim brotherhood ruling, and an awful lot of people prefer that. a lot of the arab governments prefer it. it's not clear we shouldn't. most of my friends in the foreign policy world are for cutting off
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9

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